Bonington Vitrines #10: Jewell

Jun - Jun 2019
Art and Design Degree Show
Apr - May 2019
The Big Head Man
Apr - May 2019
Bonington Vitrines #12: Complaint
Jan - Feb 2019
Bonington Vitrines #10: Jewell
Feb - Feb 2019
UKYA City Takeover
Apr - May 2019
C/J
Chloé Maratta and Joanne Robertson
Mar - Mar 2019
The Community Live in Nottingham
Nov - Dec 2018
THE SERVING LIBRARY V DAVID OSBALDESTON
Nov - Dec 2018
Bonington Vitrines #9: Towards The Serving Library Annual
Nov - Dec 2018
Emily Andersen Portraits: Black & White Book launch and exhibition
Sep - Oct 2018
BONINGTON VITRINES #8: HOUSE OF WISDOM
Jan - Feb 2019
DICK JEWELL: NOW & THEN
Sep - Oct 2018
THE ACCUMULATION OF THINGS
Apr - Apr 2018
Video Days Preview
Apr - May 2018
Video Days
Apr - Apr 2018
Video Days: Week One Screenings
Apr - Apr 2018
Video Days: Week Two Screenings
Apr - May 2018
Video Days: Week Three Screenings
May - May 2018
Video Days: Week Four Screenings
May - May 2018
Video Days: Week Five Screenings
Apr - May 2018
Bonington Vitrines #7: The Bonington building, est. 1969
Feb - Mar 2018
Bonington Vitrines #6: One Eye on the Road – festival and traveller culture since the 1980s
Feb - Mar 2018
LACE UNARCHIVED
Jan - Feb 2018
Bonington Vitrines #5: Communicating the Contemporary – The ICA Bulletin 1950s to 1990s
Nov - Dec 2017
Bonington Vitrines #4: Sara MacKillop publications, 2008–2017
Sep - Oct 2017
Bonington Vitrines #3: London’s Calling
Jan - Feb 2018
Ruth Angel Edwards: Wheel of the Year
! EFFLUENT PROFUNDAL ZONE !
Nov - Dec 2017
Sara MacKillop: One Room Living
Sep - Oct 2017
It’s Our Playground: Artificial Sensibility
Apr - May 2017
YOU’RE GONNA NEED A BIGGER BOAT
Sep - Oct 2016
MOULD MAP 6 — TERRAFORMERS
Oct - Dec 2016
KRÍSIS
Jan - Feb 2017
ALL MEN BY NATURE DESIRE TO KNOW
Jan - Feb 2017
Bonington Vitrines #2: Marbled Reams
Oct - Dec 2016
Bonington Vitrines #1: Selections from the Raw Print Archive
Feb - Mar 2017
SHAPELESS IMPACT NOT TIME SLOW IS (FLITS BY)
Feb - Mar 2016
Imprints of Culture: Block Printed Textiles of India
Apr - May 2016
PUBLISHING ROOMS
Nov - Dec 2015
In Place of Architecture
Jan - Feb 2016
Performing Drawology
Nov - Dec 2015
Photography Dialogues
Sep - Oct 2015
Inscription: The Almshouse Tempera Project
Sep - Oct 2015
Alan Kitching and Monotype
Jul - Jul 2015
Open Studio
Jun - Jul 2015
ICONS OF RHETORIC | 북한의 수사학 아이콘
Apr - May 2015
SIMON CALLERY: SOFT PAINTING
Mar - Mar 2015
Made In Wood
Feb - Mar 2015
Returns
Jan - Jan 2015
MAKE/BELIEVE
Feb - Feb 2015
Lighting the Future: No Boundaries

18 Jan - 23 Feb 2019

Close

Bonington Vitrines #10: Jewell

“In 1978, prompted by my interest in people’s attitude to photography, from beyond the primitive notion of your soul being stolen when you have your photograph taken, to whatever was the contemporary notion, I mailed an image of myself to the 84 people who at that time shared my surname in the London Phone Directory, hoping that having this in common would serve as an introduction. I asked for a photograph in return, with their name on the back so that I would know who was responding, and a very large percentage complied, but most were also accompanied by incidental information.  There were exceptions; a letter saying that there were no photographs in existence of Doris Jewell, an octogenarian living in Barnes, but I was welcome to go and take one.

This outcome led to me producing ‘London Jewells’, a poster size, four-colour lithographic letter containing a montage of all the photographs received and a précis of the written response. I mailed this poster out to my original list, but omitting the names that the Royal Mail had returned to sender as ‘’unknown at this address’’. This secondary mail out solicited a mixed response, photographs and “wish I’d taken your original letter more seriously” from some of those who had not initially responded and “thanks” from those that had.

 I then repeated the process but this time with a similar number of Jewells in the USA, utilising the Los Angeles and Miami phone directories. The response was markedly different, not in volume but by the amount of lithographically produced photographs in the form of Christmas and model agency cards etc., and also far more information on lineage with family trees going back to Bishop Jewell of Salisbury in the 16th Century.

I then framed and exhibited all this material at the 1983 Summer Show at the Serpentine Gallery in London.

In 2009 a publisher enquired of me if I had any plans for another book. I was considering returning to the ‘Jewell’ concept but this time making contact via the internet rather than the postal service; with the development of the world wide web and digital photography, our personal attitudes to portraiture had moved on, the days of Doris Jewell living a long life without a single image of her existence seemed a thing of the past. However, instead I initially ran a Google search of ‘Jewell’ for images, this subsequently also led me to video and audio material baring my surname. The items collated in alphabetical order became Jewell, a Film By Dick Jewell April-August 2010 (133mins), rather than a book it imitates the aspect of multitasking on a computer screen.

My iPhone flower portraits alongside the vitrines, seemed fitting, not only as a traditional subject for wallpaper but in our focus on genealogy when considering the juxtaposition of similar sized subject matter.”

Dick Jewell, 2019.

 

Exhibition photography courtesy of Jules Lister.

css.php