Symposium: Of Clouds and Clocks

Feb - Mar 2021
Reactor: Here, the Gold Ones meet
Oct - Nov 2020
Sophie Cundale: The Near Room – temporarily closed
Mar - May 2021
The Annotated Reader
Feb - Mar 2020
Matt Woodham: Sensing Systems (streaming online)
Jan - Jan 2020
Nick Chaffe: Motif Residency exhibition
Nov - Feb 2020
Motif
Sep - Nov 2019
Waking the witch: Old ways, new rites
Apr - May 2019
The Big Head Man
Sep - Nov 2019
Bonington Vitrines #13: Wayne Burrows – Works from the Hallucinated Archive
Apr - May 2020
Bonington Vitrines #16: The Captive Conscious (POSTPONED)
Feb - Mar 2020
Bonington Vitrines #15: Nomadic Vitrine with Mick Peter (CLOSED)
Nov - Feb 2020
Bonington Vitrines #14: Journeys to Nottingham from the Windrush Generation
Apr - May 2019
Bonington Vitrines #12: Complaint
Jan - Feb 2019
Bonington Vitrines #10: Jewell
Feb - Feb 2019
UKYA City Takeover
Apr - May 2019
C/J
Chloé Maratta and Joanne Robertson
Mar - Mar 2019
The Community Live in Nottingham
Nov - Dec 2018
THE SERVING LIBRARY V DAVID OSBALDESTON
Nov - Dec 2018
Bonington Vitrines #9: Towards The Serving Library Annual
Nov - Dec 2018
Emily Andersen Portraits: Black & White Book launch and exhibition
Sep - Oct 2018
BONINGTON VITRINES #8: HOUSE OF WISDOM
Jan - Feb 2019
DICK JEWELL: NOW & THEN
Sep - Oct 2018
THE ACCUMULATION OF THINGS
Apr - Apr 2018
Video Days Preview
Apr - May 2018
Video Days
Apr - Apr 2018
Video Days: Week One Screenings
Apr - Apr 2018
Video Days: Week Two Screenings
Apr - May 2018
Video Days: Week Three Screenings
May - May 2018
Video Days: Week Four Screenings
May - May 2018
Video Days: Week Five Screenings
Apr - May 2018
Bonington Vitrines #7: The Bonington building, est. 1969
Feb - Mar 2018
Bonington Vitrines #6: One Eye on the Road – festival and traveller culture since the 1980s
Feb - Mar 2018
LACE UNARCHIVED
Jan - Feb 2018
Bonington Vitrines #5: Communicating the Contemporary – The ICA Bulletin 1950s to 1990s
Nov - Dec 2017
Bonington Vitrines #4: Sara MacKillop publications, 2008–2017
Sep - Oct 2017
Bonington Vitrines #3: London’s Calling
Jan - Feb 2018
Ruth Angel Edwards: Wheel of the Year
! EFFLUENT PROFUNDAL ZONE !
Nov - Dec 2017
Sara MacKillop: One Room Living
Sep - Oct 2017
It’s Our Playground: Artificial Sensibility
Apr - May 2017
YOU’RE GONNA NEED A BIGGER BOAT
Sep - Oct 2016
MOULD MAP 6 — TERRAFORMERS
Oct - Dec 2016
KRÍSIS
Jan - Feb 2017
ALL MEN BY NATURE DESIRE TO KNOW
Jan - Feb 2017
Bonington Vitrines #2: Marbled Reams
Oct - Dec 2016
Bonington Vitrines #1: Selections from the Raw Print Archive
Feb - Mar 2017
SHAPELESS IMPACT NOT TIME SLOW IS (FLITS BY)
Feb - Mar 2016
Imprints of Culture: Block Printed Textiles of India
Apr - May 2016
PUBLISHING ROOMS
Nov - Dec 2015
In Place of Architecture
Jan - Feb 2016
Performing Drawology

29 Feb - 29 Feb 2020

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Symposium: Of Clouds and Clocks

This is an offsite event at Nottingham Contemporary 

Of Clouds and Clocks is an afternoon of talks and discussions with leading artists and academics crossing the boundaries of arts, science, and computing, developed as part of the multidisciplinary exhibition Sensing Systems by Matt Woodham, at Bonington Gallery, on view Feb 15 – Mar 28.

Art and Science share a common goal: to challenge common views of reality. As a creative crossroad, the contemporary field of ArtScience has been gaining momentum in recent years. Successful ArtScience merges the objective and the subjective with equal voices. It investigates and shapes the intersection between artistic concepts and developments in science and technology; experimenting with new ways of conceiving knowledge.

In this afternoon symposium, a panel of artists, scientists and ArtScientists will share their interdisciplinary research. Experts in systems across scales, from galaxy evolution to molecular nanotechnology, will discuss common dynamics in nature.

Free. Booking recommended.

Meghan Gray is an observational extragalactic astronomer with interests in galaxy evolution and large-scale structure. She employs tools such as gravitational lensing to trace distributions of dark matter on large scales and uses multiwavelength observations to examine the luminous properties of galaxies. These observations are often compared against supercomputer simulations to understand how galaxies are influenced by their environments. Meghan will provide insight into large-scale structures and simulating the universe.

Ulrike Kuchner is an extragalactic astronomer as well as a visual artist based in the UK. In her research, Ulrike studies how mass is assembled in the universe and how galaxies form and evolve over their lifetime – which is just short of the age of the universe itself. As an artist and curator, she challenges the frontiers between art and science, translating between the fields without imposing a hierarchy. Ulrike’s art often deals with the themes of humanity and imperfections in data, something we tend to strip away from science. Ulrike will provide insight into art and science and chair the panel discussions.

Andy Lomas is a computational artist, mathematician, and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer-generated effects. His artwork explores how complex sculptural forms can be created emergently by simulating growth processes. Inspired by the work of Alan Turing, D’Arcy Thompson, and Ernst Haeckel, it exists at the boundary between art and science. Andy will provide insight into simulating nature, emergent phenomena, artificial life and art.

Becky Lyon is an artist/researcher examining how humans are impacting evolution. Her practice combines scientific research, thinking-through-making, fiction, and participatory research to imagine a spectrum of new hybrid species, materialities, systems, and ways of relating. Explorations include exploring future environments through scent; contemplating the entanglement of our matter through sculpture and sound and modelling lively forms at Fieldnotes from a Technobiocology. Lyon runs ‘Elastic Nature’, an interdisciplinary art research club exploring the future of nature.

Philip Moriarty is a professor of physics in the School of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Nottingham. His research interests lie in a field sometimes referred to as extreme nanotechnology; he and his colleagues prod, poke, push, and pull individual atoms and molecules with scanning probe microscopes. He has published 140 papers to date, given over 100 invited talks. Moriarty also has a keen interest in public engagement, outreach, and the arts-sciences interface having regularly collaborated on the award-winning Sixty Symbols YouTube channel. Philip will provide insight into chaos, quantum mechanics, surface physics, and the emergence of patterns.

 

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