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Reflecting on Performing Drawology - Dominique Phizacklea 16 February 2016

Sitting in the Gallery today I have had time to reflect on the evolution that has occurred here over the last few weeks. As I had to be knowledgeable when on shift, I made time to visit and revisit the exhibition, and have watched the changes, which at first seemed subtle, explode outwards.

For me what began as simplistic has become anything but. I was unsure how I would feel when returning to the space each time. The first few weeks, I remember wanting, craving almost a mark to be made upon the clear skin of the white gallery walls, a blemish to appear on the pale rolls of paper. I had enjoyed the feeling of wonder when stumbling on the snail shells and small drawings pinned to the walls like an insect in a specimen tray. But despite this, I have struggled with feelings that the activity was too stuffy or reserved for such a large open space.

I understand the title of the exhibition “Performing Drawology” to mean the actions or performance of drawing, the strokes and movement. Like a dance. With the marks made the evidence of the action. As a Fine Art student we are always reminded to question: “what is the work? Is it the drawings? Or the act of making them?”

I feel my stance on this issue shifted during the continuation of the exhibition. I at first saw the appearance of the sculptural snails and the miniature drawings as the work, only now realising that in the later weeks, I found watching the workings of the artists to be the work and the results almost a by-product.

When returning to view Joe Graham in residence in the exhibition I had the chance to not only be part of the work by assisting him but was able to observe the decisions being formed. Despite what I felt to be a fast-paced approach to the space, I could see each movement made with his body as calculated; each mark made, each incision, each drip. When turning up for my shift, I first felt uncomfortable as the level of change from the almost sleeping state of the exhibition over the weekend of rest had awakened in to a very big and playful scene. I did not think I would like the changes, as someone who does not like change I felt almost anxious seeing the carefully folded concertina paper installations altered, cut up and strewn across the floor.

I did not think I would like exhibition after this but I was wrong. I quickly got in to the groove of Graham’s work and left my shift with a smile on my face, having enjoyed having fun in the gallery.

I return to the act of reflecting. Actively absorbing and thinking. Adjective, doing word. Today, on the last day of the exhibition, I see the finished gallery and conclude that I am among a stage set, an active space. I feel it is impossible to do nothing here now, my eyes wonder around the space in continuous movement. I watch the time-lapse video, noticing the moment where I am present. The sped-up movement return my thoughts to dance. I spin around to look at more of the room, more of the projection.

I take away my conclusion as to what the work is. For me, ultimately, I was the work. The way I now move around the Gallery in response to the performance of the artists is almost as if they had written the play and I am the dutiful performer.

Dominique Phizacklea

BA (Hons) Fine Art, Year 2.

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Visiting us safely 14 September 2020

We are delighted to reopen to the public on Monday 17 May with Here, the Gold Ones meet by Reactor, and we have put several measures in place to make your visit safe.

These measures have been informed by Government and National Museum Directors Council guidance. They are constantly under review, subject to change and may vary slightly depending on Government guidance and the official roadmap out of lockdown. Please check back to this page prior to planning your visit. 
  
Planning your visit 

Groups no larger than six should visit the gallery at any one time, providing these groups are complying with government guidance on households and bubbles. Numbers inside the gallery will initially be limited to 8 at any single time. There is additional seating and waiting areas outside the gallery for anyone arriving before their scheduled time.

Do not visit if you’re feeling unwell, or have been in contact with someone who has coronavirus, and follow the NHS coronavirus guidelines.

We will be asking for contact details of all visitors on your arrival. We recommend that you also download the NHS COVID-19 app in advance of your visit.

When you arrive 

Entrance to the gallery is still via the main entrance of the Bonington Building and floor markers will assist with social distancing. Please ‘check-in’ to the main building on arrival via the NHS app, and sanitise your hands.

If you arrive before your alotted time, you will be required to wait outside where there are benches. The building will be quieter than usual as students’ access to the campus is more restricted than normal.

At the entrance to the gallery, you will be asked to show your Eventbrite ticket and provide your contact details to support NHS Test and Trace. We will keep your details for 21 days, and will only share them with NHS Test and Trace if asked in the event of a visitor or member of the team testing positive for coronavirus. The gallery invigilator will be on hand to assist if necessary.

Face masks or coverings must be worn upon entrance to the gallery. There are some free masks available within the building if you forget. If you are exempt from wearing a mask, then please notify the gallery assistant and you will be welcomed accordingly.

2m social distancing is required inside the gallery, as it is throughout the building and campus. Please follow signage and wayfinding measures to adhere to best routes throughout the building and gallery.

Contact areas in the gallery, such as seating, will be subject to cleaning throughout the day. An enhanced cleaning regime is in place across all University buildings.

Clear signage at the gallery entrance will outline the key measures we are adhering too. Please refer to these for guidance. A gallery assistant will also be on hand to help.

Our risk assessment that has been conducted under guidance from the government and Public Health England is available to be read here. The overarching risk assessment for the wider campuses can be read here.

We have been awarded with a certificate for Visit England’s ‘We’re Good to Go’ scheme which can be read here.

50 Years of Curating and Creating Contemporary Art 12 August 2019

Bonington Gallery has been a significant part of the cultural landscape of Nottingham for half a century. Its diverse and ambitious artistic programme has consistently presented the forefront of creative practice and through this has gained a national reputation.

The gallery has showcased the very best in visual and performing arts from across the world – so join us, as we plan to make the next 50 years just as memorable.

Read more in our latest blog post.

The Community: Live in Nottingham featured on Notts TV 25 March 2019

Last week, Notts TV’s Charlotte Swindells popped down to the gallery to check out our latest exhibition, catching up with curator Tom Godfrey to find out more about the project.

Watch the video at the link below (segment starts at 27:40):

https://nottstv.com/programme/ey-up-notts-tuesday-19th-march/

Chloé Maratta - ARTnews feature 14 January 2019

This April we’re excited to be presenting a two person exhibition between artist, musician and designer Chloé Maratta and artist & musician Joanne Robertson. The exhibition will also involve artefacts from NTU’s School of Art & Design’s high-street fashion archive, FashionMap. Chloé features in a recent ARTnews article that profiles several of the ‘leading lights’ within LA’s art/fashion/music crossover scene:

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