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Elijah - The Definition of Grime (To Me): In Photos 16 May 2018

Last night we welcomed DJ, promoter and Butterz cofounder, Elijah for an engaging lecture and Q&A; tracing his journey into and through different areas of the music industry, exploring the importance of questioning everything, and what happens when “what if?” is turned into “why not?”…

Thanks to writer, critic (and grime fan) Jonathan P Watts for hosting, and to Ashley Holmes, whose 2017 film Everybody’s Hustling set the scene for the evening. It was great to welcome a lot of new faces to the gallery – so big thanks to everyone who joined us, too!

Video Days Spotlight: Elijah 11 May 2018

Bringing the Video Days event programme to a close, we’re excited to welcome Elijah for a talk and Q&A on Tuesday 15 May, from 6.30 pm – 8.30 pm.

Elijah is a DJ and promoter, and along with Skilliam, co-founder of the grime record label Butterz. In these various roles Elijah has travelled the world and shared stages with some of grime’s biggest names. For six years he hosted his own grime show on Rinse FM. Over the past year Elijah has been Associate Artistic Director at Lighthouse Arts, Brighton, an arts and culture agency producing, supporting and presenting new art, film, music, design and games. Supported by Arts Council England, this initiative promotes diversity in the arts, of which, in the UK, only a small percent of artistic directors are black and minority ethnic.

In 2014, grime began to dominate popular music. In 2015, the Tottenham-based MC Skepta beat both David Bowie and Radiohead to the Mercury Prize. When Stormzy re-recorded the single “Shut Up”, originally a viral YouTube video, it entered the 2015 Christmas UK Singles Chart at number eighteen. Since then, grime has soundtracked the so-called ‘youthquake’ that, among other things, has been credited with blocking Theresa May and the Conservatives’ hoped-for landslide in last year’s general election. Grime is the music of a generation.

As well as plotting his own experience of working in grime, by which a history of grime will emerge, Elijah’s talk will address the interrelations between visual art and music culture. He will discuss the importance of inquisitiveness and creativity in work and explore how applying organisational skills learnt in the arts and culture sector could be used in music programming, and vice versa.

Elijah’s lecture will be followed by a Q+A, hosted by Jonathan P. Watts.

Ashley Holmes’ film Everybody’s Hustling will be played on loop all day on Tuesday 15 May, from 10 am to 5 pm, then played once at the start of this event.

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» Find out more about Video Days Week Five screenings.

Images: courtesy of Elijah / Butterz

Video Days Spotlight: Emily Richardson 4 May 2018

Emily Richardson is a UK based filmmaker who creates film portraits of particular places. Her work focuses on sites in transition and covers an extraordinarily diverse range of landscapes including empty East London streets, forests, North Sea oil fields, post-war tower blocks, empty cinemas and Cold War military facilities. She is currently doing a practice-led PhD on modern architectural space in artists’ film and video at the Royal College of Art in London.

Richardson’s film Beach House, 2015 will be screened in the gallery on Tuesday 8 May (looped all day).

Beach House is a film about a unique example of rural modernism, built on the UK coast of Suffolk by architect John Penn. Penn was an architect, painter, musician and poet whose nine houses in East Suffolk are all built with uncompromising symmetry adhering to the points of the compass in their positioning in the landscape they use a limited language of materials and form that were influenced by his time spent working in California with Richard Neutra. They are Californian modernist pavilions in the Suffolk landscape.

Beach House is John Penn’s most uncompromising design in terms of idea as form. The film combines an archive film made by Penn himself on completion of the house with experimental sound recordings made during the same period and material recently filmed in the house to explore a convergence of filmic and architectural language and allow the viewer to piece together Beach House in its past and present forms. More info…

http://emilyrichardson.org.uk/

Images: courtesy of Emily Richardson and LUX, London.

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Video Days: Preview in Photos 20 April 2018

Big thanks to everyone who came along to the Preview of Video Days last night! We really enjoyed hosting Nottingham’s skate community for an evening of photos and film screenings – as well as a great talk from Chris Lawton, co-founder of Skate Nottingham. By the end of the evening a mini skate session broke out …inside the gallery…

A huge thank you again to Skate Nottingham, Varial Magazine, SkatePal, Blind Skateboards and everyone else involved for their support!


Skater: Vic Camilleri


Skater: Elliot Maynard


Vic Camilleri / Elliot Maynard


Vic Camilleri


Elliot Maynard

 

Video Days Spotlight: Rollo Jackson 18 April 2018

Rollo Jackson is a London-based director whose work spans music videos, commercial work, and documentary filmmaking.

Jackson grew up immersed in the UK’s dance music culture. His music films for James Blake, Tate Britain and Warp Records all bear the subtle traces of mid-90s escapades spent clad in Versace prints and box-fresh Reeboks and soundtracked by crackling pirate radio or booming warehouse speakers.

His short film Gang Signs & Prayer will be looped in the Gallery on Wednesday 2 May.

A visual testament to Stormzy’s life and upbringing, the film chronicles Stormzy’s inner battles and temptations as he becomes master of his own destiny. Return of the Rucksack, Bad Boys and 100 Bags, taken from Stormzy’s award winning debut studio album Gang Signs & Prayer, serve as the soundtrack to the film of the same name.

The film has also recently been nominated for a Webby Award. You can vote for Gang Signs & Prayer here.

Slimzee’s Going On Terrible will be looped in sequence with Gang Signs & Prayer on Wednesday 2 May.

Slimzee (‘Godfather of Grime’) was the co-founder of Rinse FM and DJ in the UK Garage collective ‘Pay As You Go Cartel’. Slimzee’s Going On Terrible charts his life, following his early days in pirate radio to receiving a career-threatening Asbo. Features old & new footage and interviews from fellow DJ’s & MC’s and even his own mother.

www.rollojackson.com 

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Video Days Spotlight: Karen Cunningham 9 April 2018

Karen Cunningham is an artist based in Glasgow whose practice incorporates moving image, sculpture and photography. She studied photography at Edinburgh College of Art, including a study exchange to the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore USA, and completed her MFA at Glasgow School of Art. Her film and video works have been shown throughout the UK and Europe including Tramway, Glasgow; Collective Gallery, Edinburgh; Forum Stadtpark, Graz, Austria and the Malmö Konsthall, Sweden. Interested in the ideas progress and attribution Karen’s work explores the overlapping of emergent and residual aspects within culture and technology often drawing on disciplines such as Science-Fiction and Anthropology which utilise speculative approaches to knowledge and interpretation.

Karen also curates exhibitions, organises events and writes texts. These include the symposium ‘An Endless Theater: the convergence of contemporary art and anthropology in observational cinema’ featuring works by Karen Cunningham, Edward S. Curtis, Geoffrey Farmer, Rosalind Nashashibi, Jean Rouch, Sterling Ruby and John Smith at University of Edinburgh (2013) the online screening and essay series ‘The Anthropology Effect’ for MAP magazine (2013-14) and ‘Viewfinders’ a curated selection of artists film & videos as part of the artists moving image programme at Tramway, Glasgow for ‘Generation’ (2014).

Karen’s film Movable Type; Under Erasure, 2016 will be looped all day on Saturday 28 April.

Commissioned by Legion TV, it was first shown at The Showroom, London in 2016. Filmed largely on location at Writing-on-Stone, Canada the work features an original monologue written and read by the eminent theorist and cultural critic Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak.

www.karencunningham.org

Images: Courtesy of Karen Cunningham

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Video Days Spotlight: Forensic Architecture 4 April 2018

Forensic Architecture (FA) is a research agency, based at Goldsmiths, University of London, who undertake advanced architectural and media research on behalf of international prosecutors, human rights organisations and political and environmental justice groups. Forensic architecture is also an emergent academic field developed at Goldsmiths, which refers to the production and presentation of architectural evidence – buildings and urban environments and their media representations.

In recent years FA has successfully tested its methodologies in a number of landmark legal and human rights cases undertaken together with and on behalf of threatened communities, Non-governmental organisations (NGOs), prosecutors and the United Nations (UN).

77sqm_9:26min, 2016, (27:23 mins)
Screening: Saturday 21 April, 11 am – 3 pm
Showing every 30 mins (free, no prior booking required).

Commissioned by the ‘Unraveling the NSU Complex’ people’s tribunal; Haus Der Kulturen Der Welt (HKW); Initiative 6 April; and documenta14.

Shortly after 17:00 on the 6 April 2006, Halit Yozgat, 21 years old, was murdered while attending the reception counter of his family run Internet café in Kassel, Germany. His was the ninth of ten racist murders committed by a neo-Nazi group known as the National Socialist Underground or NSU across Germany between 2000 and 2007. 

At the time of the killing, an intelligence officer named Andreas Temme was present in the shop. Temme was at the time an employee of the State Office for Constitutional Protection (Landesamt für Verfassungsschutz), the domestic intelligence agency for the German state of Hessen. Temme did not disclose this fact to the police, but was later identified from his internet records.

In his interrogation by the police, and in the subsequent NSU trial in Munich, Temme denied being a witness to the incident, and claimed not to have noticed anything out of the ordinary. The court accepted his testimony. It determined that Temme was present at the back room of the internet café at the time of the murder. It also accepted that from his position in the shop it was possible not to have witnessed the killing.

Within the 77 square meters of the Internet café and the 9:26 minutes of the incident, different actors crossed paths — members of migrant communities, a state employee and the murderers — and were architecturally disposed in relation to each other. The shop was thus a microcosm of the entire social and political controversy that makes the ‘NSU Complex’.

In November 2016, eleven years after the murder, an alliance of civil society organisations known as ‘Unraveling the NSU Complex’ commissioned Forensic Architecture to investigate Temme’s testimony and determine whether it could be truthful.


A composite of Forensic Architecture’s physical and virtual reconstructions of the internet cafe in which the murder of Halit Yozgat on 6 April 2006 occurred. Image: Forensic Architecture, 2017


Simulated propagation of sound within a digital model of the internet café that was designed to mimic the exact dimensions and materials of the actual space. Image: Forensic Architecture and Anderson Acoustics, 2017.

 

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Michael Orchard - Lace Entrepreneur 29 March 2018

During the Lace Unarchived exhibition, we have been pleased to officially launch the lace archive at NTU as the ‘Michael Orchard Lace Archive’.

NTU’s Amanda Briggs-Goode (centre) with David Orchard (left) and Research Fellow Dr. Gail Baxter

Michael Orchard was the owner of several lace businesses in the Nottingham area - Orchard & Clarke, Floral Textiles, Orchid Laces and Walter Fletchers, The Warper. He studied lace design at People’s College Nottingham in the 1950s as part of his 7-year apprenticeship. He started his own business at the age of 22 and went on to design and manufacture home textiles for his own factories and design lace for intimate apparel for all of the top lingerie brands  including Triumph, Berlei, and Wacoal. With clients from all over the world, but particularly in New York’s Garment District, he also taught the next generation of American textile manufacturers who would send their sons over to him for six months to a year to learn all aspects of the trade.

Lace Unarchived

Michael’s son, David Orchard, has, as part of a memorial to his Father in recognition of his contribution to the lace industry and heritage of Nottingham, kindly chosen to donate Michael’s collection of over 30 lace history and design books to NTU in the hope that they will continue to educate aspiring designers. He has also donated funds to support a research fellow to work with the archive to support our ongoing work to evaluate the collection from a conservation perspective to ensure that the it continues to be accessible to future generations and that they continue to benefit from this important resource.

Michael Orchard is seen in this photo (bottom left) of the Battle of Britain lace panel and his wife at the top right

Battl of Britain Panel Lace Unarchived

Battle of Britain Panel shown at Nottingham’s Council House

Commissioned work for Lace Unarchived 29 March 2018

Lace Unarchived featured two new artworks from artists James Winnett and Matt Woodham.

James Winnett –

Lace Unarchived James Winnett

Photo credit: Julian Lister

This series of new work has been produced using twelve mid 20th century lace patterns, sourced from an architectural salvage yard in Glasgow and originally produced in Nottingham and Ayrshire. In some, water has been used to loosen the original pigments and extend the geometric designs across the paper. In others, gold has been added, highlighting certain motifs to shift notions of provenance, value and authenticity. Re-presenting the industrial artefact in this way, Winnett explores processes of historicisation while interrogating the interplay between industrial and artistic labour. James’ work for Lace Unarchived has been incredibly well-received by visitors. He believes the collection on show includes some curtain lace draughts from Nottingham, which may have travelled to Scotland when a number of curtain lace factories relocated there in the 20th century.

James Winnett is a Glasgow based artist who works primarily in public art, sculpture and video. Recent exhibitions and commissions include: The Capelrig Stones, East Renfrewshire Council, 2017; Settlement, Project Room Glasgow; Green Year Artist in Residence, Glasgow City Council, 2015-16; The Cuningar Stones, 2014-16; 100 Flowers Commission, New South Glasgow Hospitals, 2015; Year of Natural Scotland Artist in Residence, Cuningar Loop, 2013-14; Glasgow Life Visual Artist Award, 2013.

James’ work can be found here: www.axisweb.org/p/jameswinnett

 

Matt Woodham

Matt Woodham Lace Unarchived

Matt Woodham is an artist, designer and creative technologist with a background in psychology & neuroscience. Through his research, and fascination for knowledge gained from empirical evidence – he strives to uncover the systems and patterns underpinning our physical and natural worlds. His research often addresses the common dynamics between different systems, such as the transfer of signal, waves, energy and information.

With a focus on the aesthetic qualities of both digital and analogue mediums, he designs and builds experiences, products, installations and audio-visual content. He aims to adjust perceptions and communicate ideas, exploring solutions to complex social problems.

He believes that the interdisciplinary space between art, science and technology can provide the possibilities for inducing both wonderment and socio-cultural advancement. Using science as the ground, technology as the tool and art as the expression.

Matt Woodham Lace Unarchived

Lace Unarchived commissioned a sculptural video piece responding to the lace archive. Matt designed a curved cabinet for 24 CRT monitors which feature digitised archival items accompanied by fabricated and real stories behind them. Matt took photographs of items from the NTU Lace Archive, and from them created a dynamic work which has been a focus of much interest in the Lace Unarchived exhibition space.

Matt’s website is: www.mdoubl.eu

The Battle of Britain Panel by Harry Cross 29 March 2018

Barbara Cross

NTU’s Amanda Briggs-Goode (right) presents panel to Barbara Cross, granddaughter of lace designer Harry Cross

Harry Cross was born in Nottingham in 1875 and and studied at the Nottingham School of Art between 1887 and 1890 – by 1891 Harry was recorded as being a lace designer.

Harry designed the well-known Battle of Britain lace panel during the latter part of the Second World War. He had by that time retired and was ‘brought out of retirement’ by the company Dobson & Brown specially to undertake this work. It’s thought that he started in 1942 and the design took two years to complete. The design was done in 11 sections and as each was completed it was passed to the Draughtsmen to enable a start on their part of the whole process.

It is thought that this project was undertaken to retain the high skills of the staff in a lace factory which was producing work focussed on the war effort and not work to their normal high standards. However, by hearsay the son of the Manager had been a pilot involved in the Battle of Britain and had been killed. If this is true it seems a reasonable explanation to produce a memorial lace panel at huge cost and effort.

Only thirty-eight panels were woven and were presented to King George VI, Winston Churchill, various RAF units, Westminster Abbey, the City of London, the City of Nottingham, airmen from the Commonwealth and several others. The design and weaving of the panels reputedly took over 3 years to complete and required 40,000 jacquard pattern cards, 975 bobbins and 41,830m of cotton for each panel. It is reported that all of the designs, drafts and jacquards were destroyed at the end of the production run.

However, thankfully Harry kept tracings of this design and between 1961 and 1970 when Harry Cross was in his 90s, he was able to replicate the original design. His family recollect that unfortunately his room could not accommodate his treasured easel so his work was then done on the dining table. The design was initially done as the original i.e. black on white paper but he decided this could be improved and used paint, pastel and gilding to colour and complete the painting. Certainly he visited the Nottingham School of Art to talk with students in the time he was busy on the painting and show one completed section at least. A small article and photograph was published in the Evening Post after this visit.

Lave Unarchived

The Battle of Britain Painting by Harry Cross

Harry’s family have kindly loaned these historic and wonderful drawings to the Nottingham Trent University lace archive. The eleven sections have now been digitally scanned and have been digitally printed on fabric at almost full scale to be displayed at the Lace Unarchived exhibition in Bonington Gallery. Two of the painted panels are included in the exhibition, clearly showing his expertise and flair for decorative design. The textile panel and paintings sit beautifully against the contemporary artworks and historic lace in the exhibition.

On the night of the exhibition special late opening, Harry’s granddaughter Barbara Cross was presented with a smaller fabric version of the panel. It was a pleasure to have her represent her Grandfather at the event.

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Ruth Angel Edwards: Featured on Bubblegum Club 13 March 2018

Ruth Angel Edwards’ solo exhibition, Wheel of the Year ! Effluent Profundal Zone ! has recently been picked up by Bubblegum Club – a ‘cultural intelligence agency’ based in Johannesburg.

Check out the article here.

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