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You're Gonna Need a Bigger Boat: Preview 20 April 2017

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Sign-painter Robert Naghi poses with his work (and a bit of old rope). Photo: Julian Hughes

You're Gonna Need a Bigger Boat: Install Sneak Peeks pt. II 12 April 2017

As promised by Jason in the Q&A, you can expect to see some narrowboat painting in the Gallery…

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All painted by hand in traditional style by the talented Robert Naghi. Join us at the preview to see the finished painting. Thursday 13 April (tomorrow!), 5 pm – 7 pm. RSVP via email to confirm your attendance.

You're Gonna Need a Bigger Boat: Install Sneak Peeks 11 April 2017

The installation for Jason Evans’ You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Boat is currently underway. Check out some sneak peeks from inside the Gallery below:

A large part of the show involves prints from the Clark Brothers extensive catalogue of promotional materials. As well as the simple one or two-colour ‘Sale” prints, there are also some interesting details to look out for…IMG_0009

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You can read about Jason’s own experience with Clark Brothers and the work they produce in the previous blog post (below).

Jason Evans Q&A 3 April 2017

Ahead of the opening of You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Boat, we caught up with Jason Evans to ask him a few questions about the exhibition….

Most people will know you as a photographer, but this exhibition seems quite different to most of your work – can you tell us how the idea came about?

Thankfully, most people don’t know me at all. While my work has many strands there is a foundation in my relationship with photography that probably colours how I approach my various outputs. In my work I often use photography to combine objects/ideas within a picture, in this instance I am combining objects/ideas in a room. 

Over the last couple of years I have been drawn to these materials which felt both in and out of step with ‘the times’ and I wanted to see what happened when I combined it all, that was the basis for the show. It struck me that there were potential conversations lurking between these things about where we’ve been and where we’re headed.

What has the process of putting the exhibition together been like? Has it been a challenge to think as a curator as well as a photographer / image-maker? 

The process of making the show has been smooth and enjoyable. It is a privilege to be able to materialise my thought processes in Nottingham, which I do not take for granted. I have previously curated shows on 90s British documentary photography and contemporary Japanese Photo Books amongst other things, so it was not much of challenge for me, particularly as Tom Godfrey has been a supportive, and cheerful, sounding board.

What can people expect to see when they enter the exhibition?

No spoilers, that is for them to find out… I can promise a bloody big rope and some narrowboat painting. Some of the exhibition is happening off-site around Nottingham, people could unwittingly find themselves in the audience…

Sounds interesting… can you tell us a bit more about what you have planned away from the Gallery?

If you work in the gallery system one big white room can look and feel pretty much like another, regardless of if you’re in Korea or Canada. I look for a reason to be in a specific place, to find out something about the culture beyond the exhibition. I want to make relevant work. I often invite visitors to take something from the gallery out into the community, so the gallery becomes a point of departure that encourages reflection through participation. 

In this instance [Philip] Hagreen’s work lends itself to reproduction on t-shirts and so his work will circulate locally in that way. I am looking forward to meeting the volunteers and making portraits with them.

Other than it being ideal to reproduce on a t-shirt – what else drew you to Hagreen’s work?

His work feels relevant. Hagreen made his politically charged ‘lampoon’ prints around the time of the second world war, a time of crisis and austerity. As a nation we are currently engaged in war plus we are, arguably, in crisis and we face an imposed austerity. Go figure…

Can you tell us about your binary prints? What inspired these?

I have been working with diagonally divided blocks of colour painted onto the wall since my first solo show in 2008 and it was the right time to turn this process into objects. I had them industrially screen printed onto display board using a colour palette culled from a Japanese commercial design guide. To me they look like signs, and belong to a colour-way described as ‘pretty’. They are reductive image/text pieces, each one has a two word title, though it remains ambiguous as to which word relates to which colour, a subjective response is encouraged, in that way I think they are photographic.

Your photos often have a similar graphic quality to them in the use of contrasting colours and shapes – is this something you thought about when making the prints?

I guess the way I am hardwired predisposes me to certain aesthetics. While disparate my output has these themes running though it. At times I work in high key ways, enthusiastic for shapes, patterns, repeats, multiples, high contrast and deep saturation… this is one of those times. I also go though periods of producing more nuanced monochromatic work. Last year I got to marry those aesthetics in my Tool Shed Dark Room project.

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Jason Evans, The Daily Nice. Via WE FOLK

Can you tell us how/why you first came across Clark Brothers, and what it’s like working with them/the materials they produce? You produced a zine with photos from inside the shop in 2016 – was this the first time you visited the shop?

I first visited Clark Brothers in 2015. It’s just around the corner from the (excellent) Piccadilly Records in Manchester.

I think you find what you need in life, if you are paying attention, it’s all there in front of you.

The window display caught my eye, it was like I had died and gone to heaven when I walked in, total time warp. I recommend a visit, it’s a very specific and poignant cultural experience. 

Despite the digital/internet transitions of the last 20 years the business has continued to hand produce promotional materials for the trade industry on the premises and has no online presence. I get a wonderful sense of nostalgia in the place which somehow dodges the long shadows of digital marketing technologies and the property development of the Northern Quarter in Manchester. When I took some of their posters to the New York Art Book Fair with the zine in 2016 they sold out on the second day, somehow it’s also ‘right for now’.

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Jason Evans, Clark Brothers of Manchester, 2016

Any final thoughts about the exhibition?

I am looking forward to seeing how the various elements of the show bounce off each other, and I’m curious to see what the audience makes of my new sculpture and prints, it’s the first time I’ve not shown any photography. I wonder what people will make of the [Dick] Hambidge archive – it’s never been seen before. We are encouraging visitors to redefine and redistribute the content with their smart phones; there are specific photo opportunities within the show and relevant hashtags (#youregonnaneedabiggerboat) are suggested. It’s going to be fun meeting the Hagreen volunteers wearing the special t-shirt edition that we have produced to take the show into the city, and hopefully encourage the city to come and see the show.

You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Boat will open with a preview on Thursday 13 April, 5 pm – 7 pm. If you would like to attend, please RSVP via email to confirm your attendance.

Opportunity: Jason Evans T-Shirt Project 29 March 2017

Volunteers wanted to participate in a t-shirt project as part of Jason Evans’ ‘You’re Gonna Need A Bigger Boat’ exhibition which opens here at the Gallery on Wednesday 19 April. Read the brief from Jason below: 

I am looking for volunteers to wear specially produced t-shirts; made to extend the reach of my exhibition ‘You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Boat’ at Bonington Gallery, Wednesday 19 April – Friday 19 May 2017. More information about the exhibition can be found here on the exhibition page.

I am looking for willing individuals who work in public facing roles to wear the shirt that features a wood-engraving by artist Philip Hagreen (see below). While I am in Nottingham I will attempt to make a portrait of as many of the participants as possible, in their place of work, and would encourage ongoing sharing of images of the shirts online/in social media, with the accompanying hashtag #youregonnaneedabiggerboat and/or #philiphagreen. The intention is to build up an inventory of images of people wearing this t-shirt during the exhibition dates and beyond.

In recognition of your contribution to the project all participants can keep their (limited edition) t-shirt.

Please email boningtongallery@ntu.ac.uk with the subject heading ‘T-shirt Project’ to register your involvement or to find out more about the project. T-shirts are available in standard sizes ranging from small to x-large. In your email, please indicate the size you would like.

Jason Evans
www.jasonevans.info

 

Phhilip Hagreen T-ShirtMaking Ends Meet

Image: Wood engraving by Philip Hagreen, courtesy of Ditchling Museum of Arts + Craft

Giorgio Sadotti Workshop 6 March 2017

Review: Time, Motion & A Piano: SHAPELESS IMPACT NOT TIME SLOW IS (FLITS BY) 3 March 2017

Mark Patterson reviews Giorgio Sadotti’s solo exhibition for the Nottingham Post’s Entertainment Guide. Featuring thoughts from Giorgio, the review also  includes more about the background and aims of the exhibition, as well as Giorgio’s time spent studying here at NTU.

Download the PDF.

SHAPELESS IMPACT NOT TIME SLOW IS: PREVIEW IN PICTURES 3 March 2017

Just a few photos from the preview last week, following on from the INAUGURATING INCANTATION performance…

Full documentation of the exhibition coming soon.

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VIDEO: Giorgio Sadotti: SHAPELESS IMPACT NOT TIME SLOW IS (FLITS BY): INAUGURATING INCANTATION 24 February 2017

To mark the opening of his solo exhibition here at the Gallery, Giorgio Sadotti led 80+ volunteers in an INAUGURATING INCANTATION. With the audience entering in silence and into near total darkness, the performance evoked the sense of a sort-of ritual taking place in a cave. Evidence of the performance has now been left in the space, creating an installation which will remain throughout the duration of the exhibition.

Thanks to all who came along to the preview, and special thanks to all the volunteers who took part in the performance.We couldn’t have done it without you!

Giorgio Sadotti will be giving a live lecture next week in Newton building’s lecture theatre (just across the road) – don’t miss it!

You can find out more about Giorgio’s exhibition here.

Featured news
Exhibition Review: Street Signs of the Times 21 April 2017

Mark Patterson reviews Jason Evans’ exhibition, You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Boat for the Nottingham Post. Download the PDF to read the article.

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