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Selections from The Serving Library: GREY PAINTING: TEXT VERSION 2 14 November 2018

Philomene Pirecki, oil painting, 2008, 35.6 x 25.5 cm

Dear Philomene, As you know, I’d like to reproduce that deceptively modest painting of yours — the one whose primary colors combine to spell out their composite and form their own frame—on the cover of this last Dot Dot Dot.

(“A Word on the Cover,” Stuart Bailey, Dot Dot Dot #20, 2010)

http://www.servinglibrary.org/collection/grey-painting-text-version-6

Selections from The Serving Library: XTC, GO 2 2 November 2018

LP sleeve design by Hipgnosis, 1979, 32.5 x 32.5 cm

This is a RECORD COVER. This writing is the DESIGN upon the record cover. The design is to help SELL the record. We hope to draw your attention to it and encourage you to pick it up. When you have done that maybe you’ll be persuaded to listen to the music — in this case XTC’s Go 2 album. Then we want you to BUY it.

(“On Graphic Design, 1979,” Stuart Bailey, Dot Dot Dot #2, 2001)

http://www.servinglibrary.org/collection/xtc-go-2

Selections from The Serving Library: OUIJA BOARD FOR JOSEF ALBERS 25 October 2018

Paul Elliman, 2002, 41 x 41 cm

A few years ago a friend of mine said she had just been introduced to Josef Albers. The idea that he was still around was compelling — artists have always tried to keep in historical contact through works from the past. Why not make contact with Albers directly? Adding the words YES and NO to an Albers-designed stencil typeface turned it into a kind of Ouija board, and it’s also an Albers material — his square paintings were made on this board, in 16, 24 and 40 inch sizes.

(“A–Z, 0–9, YES/NO,” Paul Elliman, Dot Dot Dot #13, 2006)

http://www.servinglibrary.org/collection/ouija-board-for-josef-albers

Selections from The Serving Library: DIAGRAM FOR A SEARCH ENGINE 21 October 2018

David Osbaldeston, woodcut, 2008, 63.3 x 51 cm

Is it good enough? Is it even art? I don’t know. It might look like art, it might even look like contemporary art, but I really don’t know if it will be. And to be frank, I don’t mind if it isn’t, it doesn’t change the fact that to me it needs to be done.

(“Another Shadow Fight,” Andrew Hunt & David Osbaldeston, Dot Dot Dot #16, 2006)

http://www.servinglibrary.org/collection/diagram-for-a-search-engine

Selections from The Serving Library: PORTRAIT OF GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE 18 October 2018

Alex Klein, photographic print, 2009, 60 x 52 cm

So we were already cutting up our mutual identities and, as we did that, we started to think about why it was so appealing to us. And one of the things that we decided was that we were both at war with binary culture, the idea of male and female, black and white, Christian/Muslim, good/bad — all these different either/ors that you mentioned, which are embedded in most cultures. Again, as Burroughs would say, “Look for the vested interest …”. To control people, to make people behave as stereotypes in order for things to be simple and easy to control. Anarchy and confusion are not necessarily friendly towards control! So, we began to look at that aspect of it. Why be male or female?

(“Vested Interest: Mark Beasley in conversation with Genesis Breyer P-Orridge,” Dot Dot Dot #16, 2008 / Cover of Dot Dot Dot #17, 2009)

http://www.servinglibrary.org/collection/portrait-of-genesis-breyer-p-orridge

Selections from the Serving Library: GERMAN CAR LICENSE PLATE WITH THE TYPEFACE FALSCHUNGSERSCHWERENDE SCHRIFT 18 October 2018

Born awkwardly between eras — drawn by hand in order to be better read by machines — the fälschungserschwerende Schrift bears the marks of both 19th-century guild-enshrined handcraft and 20th-century anonymous automation. And like any technology, it is bound by the political determinants of its design: while its original “tamper-proof ” premise may have proved a Macguffin, these weird-looking letters are an early product of our contemporary surveillance state. What reads to us as a clumsy lack of formal continuity is exactly what makes it legible to a computer. It is an alphabet whose defining characteristic is precisely that it has no defining characteristic, other than having no defining characteristic.

(“Fälschungserschwerende Schrift,” Benjamin Tiven, Bulletins of The Serving Library #3, 2012)

http://www.servinglibrary.org/collection/german-car-license-plate-with-the-typeface-flschungserschwerende-schrift

The Accumulation of Things featured by i-D 1 October 2018

Check out i-D‘s recommendation of the best things to watch, see and do this week (1 Ocotber, 2018)… including our current exhibition, The Accumulation of Things!

The Accumulation of Things / House of Wisdom: Preview in Photos 28 September 2018

Thanks to everyone who came along to yesterday’s double preview event… what a great way to launch our autumn season of exhibitions!

Special thanks to all of the curators and artists involved in putting together both exhibitions –


Bonington Vitrines #8: House of Wisdom
(left-right) Tuna Erdem and Seda Ergül (Istanbul Queer Art Collective), Dr Cüneyt Çakırlar, and Mine Kaplangı (Collective Çukurcuma)


The Accumulation of Things
(left-right) curator Adam Murray, Julie Greve, Joe Bloom, Evie O’Connor, Alicia Jalloul, Max Prus, Tom Godfrey.

Both exhibitions are now open until Saturday 27 October. For more information, visit the exhibition pages.

Featured news
Selections from The Serving Library: PORTRAIT OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN / “TRYING TO FIND FLAWS, IF ANY, IN AN ENLARGEMENT OF A SUPERDOLLAR” 17 October 2018

Ahead of our next exhibition, The Serving Library v David Osbaldeston, we’ll be highlighting just a few of the 100+ framed objects that make up The Serving Library (TSL) collection, along with the accompanying text from TSL’s website.

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The Accumulation of Things featured by 10 Magazine 27 September 2018

Thanks to 10 Magazine for featuring The Accumulation of Things as their 10’s To See.

The feature includes a preview of the exhibition, plus interviews with three of the exhibiting artists »

Joy Labinjo » Evie O’Connor and Julie Greve.

Read the article here.

The Accumulation of Things featured on Dazed & Confused 24 September 2018

Our September/October exhibition has been included in the Dazed & Confused list of “Art shows to leave the house for this month”.

Check out the full feature here, which also includes exhibitions at Tate Modern, Barbican, and Somerset House.

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